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How To Find Inexpensive Audition Studios

Hey there!

There are a number of studios that offer what are called “talent rates,” at usually around a dollar a minute: $10 for ten minutes, $20 for twenty minutes, and so on. This is usually for stopping by, doing an audition and sending it off. These rates are for VO talent that either have yet to install home/portable equipment, or are at the wrong end of town, or can’t get to your agency when a last minute audition comes in. Continue Reading →

Why You Might Have More Than One Microphone Open And Not Know It

Hey, there!

My Pro member, Karen, recently wrote me about something she’d seen on one of the groups she follows on LinkedIn, Audiobook Narrators. (She’s a really good one.)

She works very hard to make sure her space is as quiet as possible, but noticed that getting rid of excessive room noise was proving next to impossible.

The potential issue:

If you use a Windows-based laptop or desktop, you might have more than one microphone open on your computer, even though you’ve only selected one via Audacity.

That’s a big problem.

Here’s the solution. Continue Reading →

How To Sanitize NSFW Audiobook Demo Material

Hey, there!

You’ve heard me say that once you get booked on something, make updating your resume and demo portfolio part of your work.

I commit to you that this year, I’ll do a better job of that myself. I’ve been so busy that I’ve become lax in that area.

So when my copy of League of Denial showed up in the mail, I tore into the package and ripped a section that I knew I wanted to feature in a demo on ACX and elsewhere.

But I had a problem.

The clip I wanted to use contained profanity.

I also had a solution: I used Audacity to fix that. Continue Reading →

Normalization

Hey, there!

When auditioning, giving a loud, clean sound to your submissions is essential. The level at which you safely record those auditions, being careful not to overdrive the microphone or recorded signal, can leave you with a properly recorded, but weak sounding final product. Here’s how to fix that. Continue Reading →